tutorial

Serial Podcast, Episode 8, In Which Sarah States the Obvious

The jury believed the state’s one witness, Jay.

Shocker.

If I were a three year old, I’d probably say duh.  Of course the jury believed Jay, or Adnan wouldn’t be sitting in jail in Maryland, chit chatting on the phone about his innocence.  And why did they believe Jay – again, a no-brainer, because he was believable.

And sometimes, that’s just it – the heart of a criminal case.  The witness says something that rings true, resonates with the jury, and that’s it.

And, I think I alluded to it in my first post- although I didn’t totally spell it out.  I think I had totally spelled it out in a first draft – that moment when you know the case has turned, one way or another, but I did so in a way that I related it to a case that I had, and decided that I didn’t want to do that.  I don’t tell war stories on my blog – it’s just not fair to old clients, future clients, whatever, to turn them into blog fodder, and even when names are changed, and the case becomes somewhat unrecognizable, it’s still a violation, not necessarily of attorney client privilege, because “just the facts” could easily be all in the public record – no, it’s more a matter of trust.  I’m a lawyer, I follow the law in that I keep up with current trends, current cases, etc., and I have my opinions about the law, that’s who I am, but I can leave it at that.  So, without any examples or analogies or real life stories, you’ll have to take more word for it, that the truth is this, a witness can be a liar, and stil be believed, and even when you lose when you should have won, you can put your finger on that moment when everything turned.

So, I didn’t have much take away from this episode, except other than to question the order of episodes, and how Sarah is unfolding this story.  I think it’s pretty clear that she must have contacted Jay during that year she was researching the show, and maybe held off publishing this particular episode, hoping that maybe he’d change his mind about giving a recorded interview.  I think she also spoke to the juror’s fairly early on too – especially when she was perhaps framing the story as why did they believe Jay?  how can someone, like Adnan, have two very different faces?  Why did the jury see the Adnan that could strangle his girlfriend?  I’m not sure what it does for the story to place this episode in the story arc here.  Is it just a week to week roller coaster?  One week he looks guilty, one week he looks innocent, the next we’re back to guilty?  Or is it because she really is back to her original questions, about public and private faces, and this week she tried to unmask Jay, and next week, she will reveal who she has come to believe Adnan is.  And that’s important – who she thinks he is – because it’s her story. And that couldn’t have been clearer as when she played her favorite favorite piece of tape she’s played so far – that of a witness who’s conclusion is basically an incomprehensible, Elmer Fuddish, “what the fuck?” But, I’m still hooked, so I’ll be back.

And, a few things as a side note – first, Sarah says that much of Adnan’s trial was boring.  Ok, well, trial’s aren’t supposed to be entertainment. But, on the other hand, she mentioned something about having consulted experts about the idea that being boring could be a trial strategy, and they agreed.  Huh?  Wrong wrong wrong.  To be boring is to be unlikeable, and that is never a good idea.  And, it won’t work – you will never wear a witness down until they yell uncle.  Cross-examination, when done correctly is not an endurance contest.

Here’s the way a trial is supposed to go, from a defense perspective.  You have a story to support your theory of your client’s innocence – and everything flows from there.  You pick your jury based on your theory, you open with your theory, and every question you ask a witness pertains to your theory, and makes your theory the truth of the case.  Jay being a liar is not a theory.  Jay being a liar is a fact.  There was no reason to keep the guy on the stand for five days proving what everyone already agreed upon – Jay lied in his first statement, and was inconsistent in his second.  She could have opened her case with “we can all agree Jay is a liar, and by the end of this trial you will too.”  The question is why is he lying – and if you don’t have a theory for that, you had better have a theory for why it doesn’t matter that he’s lying, he just is.  If not, if you’re just screaming in his face that he lied to the police in his first statement – again – I say, duh, everyone agrees about that.  What it really means, if you’re thrashing around trying to get him to yell uncle, is that you have zero theory of the case.  You have zero story of innocence for the jury.  Because all of your questions should go to your theory of the case.

Jurors are instructed that lawyers’ questions are not evidence.  But, the jury hears the defense attorney’s questions, and they can’t unhear them, and your questions should tell a story.  And, if your story makes sense, and rings true, you win.  If  however, the witness turns to the judge and politely asks the judge to please ask the defense attorney to stop yelling in his face, and he does it in such a way that the jury thinks “what a nice young man, yeah, tell her to stop yelling,” dude, you’ve lost.  Cross examination is an art, and the real skill of it is in listening, not in talking.   I take very few notes while a witness is testifying on direct – I’m listening for my “in” – and what I mean by that is the little nugget the witness gives me that was foreshadowed in my opening, and completely fits into my theory of defense.  And that’s where I start my cross.  And the rest of the cross falls into chapters, or topics – and yeah, it’s animated, contentious, sometimes there’s yelling, sometimes you have to repoint out inconsistencies – or remind them that they’re liars, but for the most part, the cross is story driven, not hear yourself talk and yell driven.  And, remember that moment when Adnan’s attorney directly asks Jay if he killed Hae, and he says, “No M’am.”  Well, if she had been crossing him with a theory and her theory made more sense than his answer – than his answer wouldn’t have rung true, like it clearly did in just that short piece of tape that we heard on the program.

What’s my point?  Again, it’s about Sarah’s storytelling.  She seems to really not want this case to boil down to bad lawyering.  Because really, bad lawyering leads to no answers.  The best case scenario for the quesitons she’s asking, about why they believed Jay, why they convicted on his testimony alone – shouldn’t come down to bad lawyering, or the question becomes meaningless. So, instead Sarah writes off what was clearly a bad cross-examination – just hearing he was on the stand for five days is proof that it had to be meandering and pointless – as a stratgey of being boring.  Yeah, no.

And the second thing – about Adnan’s failure to testify.

Jurors are obviously instructed that they can’t hold the defendant’s failure to testfy against him.  And, this topic is part of the voire dire – the jury selection process.  Jurors are asked if they can follow that instruction.  This is very important – it all goes back to starting your case with your theory – and picking a jury based on your theory.  If you, as a defense attorney, can tell your client’s story better than your client, then you should – that’s your job, and you know from the get go that he won’t be testifying.  There are a gazillion reasons why your client can’t testify – he has a stutter when he gets nervous, he has an abrasive personality, when he gets nervous, he just can’t speak, if he testifies maybe it will open the door to evidence that you don’t want the jury to hear, your client is gigantic and scary looking and you don’t want him that close to the jury. Testifying is such a difficult thing, and while a jury will forgive another witness, not the defendant. If a defendant testifies, everything that preceded the defendant’s testimony becomes irrelevant, except for the analysis as to how it relates to what the defendant says. It’s all on the defendant’s shoulders. And if a juror feels that’s the way it should be, they need to go. So, you have to weed out those jurors who are going to hold his silence against him.  And that’s different from wanting to hear from him.  All jurors want to hear two sides of a story, it’s human nature.  A good juror is going to say, darn, he didn’t testify.  Ok, let’s look at the evidence.  A bad juror is going to say, he didn’t testify – he must be guilty, what innocent man wouldn’t get up there to defend himself?  So, when you do voire dire, you need to strike the people who want to hear from your client.  Alot of defense attorneys get wrapped up in questioning jurors about believing police more than lay people, because supposedly that question reveals good defense jurors. That’s ridiculous. If your theory of the case does not involve police credibility then this question shouldn’t be your starting point for using your strikes. I could go on and on about this, but I’ll get to my point.

The point is this – Sarah believes that if Adnan had testified he would have been acquitted – when he talks to her, even when he has no alibi, no explanation for certain things (and I’d suggest he hasn’t even been asked very hard questions – like why did you write I will kill on top of the note). So did she bring it up to explain the conviction, or did she bring it up because it allows her to flip the burden – it’s not that the jury necessarily believed Jay, they just didn’t get a chance to hear Adnan.

It’s all about Sarah.

But, obviously, I’m still going with it.

Blocking Brigid

Whoah Nelly!  Two knitting posts in one month?  I’m feeling a little 2009ish.  Swell!  And, wait to you see what I cast on next (and you do have to wait because I haven’t photographed it yet).

I have one word for the next project.

Starmore.

And no more I’ll say.

Anyway, I took photographs of Brigid (from Vintage Modern Knits) blocking, so I thought I’d share a few blocking tips.  I feel like I should have a title like 10 Helpful Blocking Tips, but I’m doing this off the top of my head, and I don’t know if I’ll get to ten.  

So first – block.

That’s it – number 1 advice stands alone – you must block your garments, or they’ll look like poo.  I know people who don’t.

And I’ll say no more.

I’ve already said what I think they’re finished garments look like.

No. 2 – Block before you sew.  Why?  Because I said so, dammit.

No, really – here’s why.  Because sewing your garment together is probably going to be trickier than knitting it was, and you want to make your life easy.  So, before you sew – and I know you just want to dive right in and do it, but don’t – get out the schematic that came with your pattern, and block your pieces just like their accompanying pictures.

Schematic?  Huh? You say – this isn’t one of those crazy Ikea products I have to put together, this is knitting, what are you talking about, schematic?  Every knitting pattern should have a diagram, a little picture of the finished pieces, showing the measurements for each size.  The more measurements given, the better the schematic.  And, if your pattern doesn’t have a schematic, you have a crappy pattern.  And if you have a crappy pattern, you should draw yourself a sketch of what the schematic should look like based on the measurements you were given in the pattern.

And now the magic begins.  You have all of these curly, unruly pieces of knitting, that may look two sizes too small (if they look two sizes too big, they probably are, and you didn’t properly check your gauge – and that’s another lesson for another day, and if it looks more than 2 sizes too small, again, it probably is, it’s not just cables that need to bloom, or lace that needs to grow.  At that point, you have a choice to make – you can block it long, you can block it wide, but you can’t do both – you can only compensate so far.  And if you try to pull the fabric out too much – you’ll get crazy points in the fabric.  If it’s too small, and you aggressively block – you may damage the integrity of the yarn and your stitches, and you may want to just consider gifting or ripping).  But, it’s typical for yarn to bloom once its wet, and once you start blocking – and all of that, say lace – once you get it on your floor, your blocking board, whatever – it’s going to take form, those cables?  will magically unsquish.  There is one bit of magic that blocking can’t do – it cannot fix a too tightly bound off edge.  So, if in your desire to get your project done, you bound off your stitches so tightly that the edge curves – take a step back.  Put your pins away.  Go back, rip out the cast off, and do it again with a bigger needle.  If you don’t, it will always curve.  Water and pins can only do so much.

Now, of course, I didn’t take any photos of the presewing blocking of Brigid.  But, here are your basic steps – (I’m recounting because this seems like very disorganized babble but I really don’t feel like editing this – I know, I’m not winning any blogging awards any time soon) – so – 1. Choose blocking, 2. Block before Sewing, 3. Find Your Schematic

Once you have that down, wet your pieces.  Now here’s an important think – you’re wetting wool – don’t felt your sweater before you even get it on the blocking board.  Put the thing in your sink, get it wet, but don’t be aggressive with it – at all.  I run the water over the garment, let the water soak in, and then I drop it in a towel that’s been spread out.  Then, to get the excess water out, I don’t squeeze it – I simply roll up it up in the towel.  Roll, don’t squeeze = no felting.

Next, get your blocking tools ready.  I use a blocking board.  If you don’t have a blocking board, use your floor.  But, whatever you use, make sure you have some kind of measuring instrument.  That’s why the blocking board is nice – it’s divided into blocks.

Gosh this post is sounding more and more like a field guide to brain surgery with every sentence – a blocking board has blocks – genius!

Ok, so you have your blocking board, with little blocks on it, and your pins.

Pins are your friends.

You can never over pin.

Pins = use them. 

Use them alot.

So, take your pieces – generally your front (or fronts if it’s a cardigan), the back, and your sleeves.  And the most important thing you’re going to block – meaning, pin into place according to the measurements on your diagram/schematic – is the armhole. And the sleeve cap.

If you screw up the armhole and/or the sleeve cap you’re doomed.

Sorry, but true.

If you screw up the armhole, you’re going to find yourself fudging the sewing – the sleeve cap must fit into armhole – and if it doesn’t you’re going to have a lump of fabric either in the armpit, or on the shoulder – Quasimodo, Elephant Man, you take your pick.

And the beauty of blocking is that even if you’ve screwed up your decreases (just a little bit, you can’t fix big big mistakes with blocking) on your armhole or sleeve cap, you can probably fix them when you block, as long as you’re following your little picture/diagram/schematic.  Fudge while blocking, not while sewing.

So pin out all of your pieces – I pin them on my blocking board just like the diagram – so I have a sleeve on each side – blocked very near the arm hole so I can eyeball that they’re going to work.  Two fronts of a cardigan I’ll block side by side, so I know they’re the same length, width, etc. and then I’ll block the back.

Then let it dry – overnight.  Don’t skimp on the drying.  Just let it sit.  Patience.  I know it’s hard – but do it.

Then, you can sew.

And then, sometimes, you can block again!

And that’s where my pictures come in.

Once blocked, and sewn (and sewn much easier because you have nicely blocked, flat edges, and perfectly formed armoles and sleeve caps), often, you have to pick up a buttonband and a collar.  Sometimes, after I’ve done that part of the finishing, I’ll block the whole garment in one piece, to get a nice edge on my button band, and a nice even edge to the hole garment)  –

 

So – there you have it.  I have again wet my jacket, and gotten it into shape on the board.

I have been generous in my use of pins – pinning down the buttonband, and the bottom of my jacket.

And why aren’t the sleeves pinned?  Because at this point I was happy with their shape, they didn’t need any additional pins – and the only thing I could have done to them at this point is over block them – pin them in strange, contorted ways that would result in some crazy point in the fabric.

Love these buttons!

So, there you have it.  Any questions?  I know this was completely and totally clear.

Seriously, if you need any help, feel free to email.

 

 

 

Touch Up Tuesday – A New Leaf

Did I do it?  I think I did it – mouseover – voila!  Before, after!  Fab.

So, how did I get from the before to the after?  Luckily, it’s Touch Up Tuesday, so here it goes:

From the before image above, I fixed the exposure in ACR –

LeafafterACR 

Then, I started piling on the textures:

Screenshotredleaf 

First, I duplicated the background, and then I applied a black to white gradient map, at normal blending mode, 100%.  I then added a layer mask, and brushed the black and white off the leaf.

Then, I duplicated the background again, popped it on top, at Soft Light blending mode, 100%.

Now the image looked like this:

Haflwaydonescreenshot 

At this point, I thought it looked really wintery, and I wanted to keep that fall feel.  So, I picked textures that I knew would warm the image up, and give it drama.

So, I then added Kim Klassen’s Light Paper texture, at Color Burn at 40%.  That really made the leaf pop, giving it that red color.  Now, I was pretty happy with the color of the foliage, but not with the washed out sky.  I added Kim’s Warm Grunge Texture at Multiply, 40%, which gave the sky a cloudy coffee like texture.  And, to finish it off, I added Kim’s Warm Palette texture at Soft Light 100%, and that just made the image glow.

Last Red Leaf 

That’s it!  Easy peasy!

And, for a tutorial on how to do the mouseover affect, check this out!  For those of you who use Flickr, you can skip the part of the tutorial about creating posts just to get URL’s.  Just go to your image in Flickr, and click on Share.  Under Share, go to grab the HTML code – you don’t need to grab the entire code – just grab the part that starts with farm5.static, and ends with jpeg.  For instance, the code for one of these images was http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4103/5182611089_1370bb585e.jpg — just plug that code into Shadowhouse Creations’ script, and you’ll be good to go!

 

Touch Up Tuesday's at the Paper Mama

{108/365} – Simple Enchantment

Honestly, the photo below (the Good Day Door) really tickled me today, but I didn’t have my camera with me, and I don’t know, the iphone just didn’t do it justice.  So, I was hard pressed to think of something else inspired by today’s prompt – simple enchantment.  Until, that is, I started wrapping my husband’s 40th birthday presents.

{107/365} 

What could be more inspiring than wrapping presents for my honey?  Delighted indeed.

For the photo, I basically used the same process I used on yesterday’s Cardinal, and since I really love how the Cardinal turned out, I thought I’d share the recipe:

Here’s the original:

 

And here’s how I did the edit:

CardinalPhotoshopScreen

1.  First I did a levels adjustment, then I ran Paint the Moon’s Action, Tack Sharp, and then I flattened the image.

2.  I duplicated the background, and set the blending mode to soft light.

3.  The first gradient map, black to white, is set to normal, and with a brush at around 30% opacity, I brushed some color back onto the bird and the branch.

4.  The second gradient map, again black to white, is set to soft light.

5.  Then, I popped the background back on top, setting it at soft light.

6.  Now for the textures.  Both textures I used are from Kim Klassen’s I need an IMac texture pack.  I love every one.   The first texture is “Grunge with Text” – this is my second fav texture in the pack.  I used two layers of that texture, both on soft light, 100%.

7.  Now for my favorite texture in the bunch – Inked.  It’s speckled awesomeness with some kind of a composition book weave texture going on as well.  The first layer is set to multiply, the second to soft light.  On both layers, I brushed the texture off the bird at with a soft round brush at about 75% opacity.

8.  And for the final touch, the background layer once again, on soft light.

Voila!

Cardinal  

And there you have it, today’s Before and After! Thanks Kim!!!!!

 

{108/365} – Simple Enchantment

Honestly, the photo below (the Good Day Door) really tickled me today, but I didn’t have my camera with me, and I don’t know, the iphone just didn’t do it justice.  So, I was hard pressed to think of something else inspired by today’s prompt – simple enchantment.  Until, that is, I started wrapping my husband’s 40th birthday presents.

{107/365} 

What could be more inspiring than wrapping presents for my honey?  Delighted indeed.

For the photo, I basically used the same process I used on yesterday’s Cardinal, and since I really love how the Cardinal turned out, I thought I’d share the recipe:

Here’s the original:

 

And here’s how I did the edit:

CardinalPhotoshopScreen

1.  First I did a levels adjustment, then I ran Paint the Moon’s Action, Tack Sharp, and then I flattened the image.

2.  I duplicated the background, and set the blending mode to soft light.

3.  The first gradient map, black to white, is set to normal, and with a brush at around 30% opacity, I brushed some color back onto the bird and the branch.

4.  The second gradient map, again black to white, is set to soft light.

5.  Then, I popped the background back on top, setting it at soft light.

6.  Now for the textures.  Both textures I used are from Kim Klassen’s I need an IMac texture pack.  I love every one.   The first texture is “Grunge with Text” – this is my second fav texture in the pack.  I used two layers of that texture, both on soft light, 100%.

7.  Now for my favorite texture in the bunch – Inked.  It’s speckled awesomeness with some kind of a composition book weave texture going on as well.  The first layer is set to multiply, the second to soft light.  On both layers, I brushed the texture off the bird at with a soft round brush at about 75% opacity.

8.  And for the final touch, the background layer once again, on soft light.

Voila!

Cardinal  

And there you have it, today’s Before and After! Thanks Kim!!!!!

 

{106/365} – Picture Fall – Time Out

Somedays, I think I’m perpetually on time out – a bit out of step with everyone else.  And, I guess that’s why self-portraiture is something that’s completely out of my comfort zone – because you have to be in sync on both sides of the camera.  I wasn’t, completely:

{106/365} 

My remote didn’t work, Lemon kept running in and out of the frame (not so good for the timer), and bouncing back into bed, grabbing my needles, and getting underway knitting in 10 seconds is also no easy feat.  But, it wasn’t as painful as I thought.

These girls took a lovely time-out (I think I took this last weekend, maybe) – and since I haven’t done a texture recipe in a while, I thought I’d take the rather dull originals and play with them:

Here’s the SOOC of the first one:

Girls in the Park Original 

And here’s after a bit of mad scientist messing:

Girls in the Park 

And, here’s the second one:

Girls in the Park 2 original 

Girls in the Park 2 

So, what did I do?  Maybe turned them into crap, I don’t know, but here it is:

girlsinparkworkspace

1.  Duplicated the background layer

2.  Added a brown color fill layer, I think on soft light

3.  Added a gradient map layer, from black to white, on soft light mode

4.  Duplicated the gradient map layer, changed the blending mode to normal, and then, instead of changing the opacity of the whole layer, I ended up brushing off about 50% with a brush (I originally was only going to the black and white of some of it, but then took it off all of it)

5.  Added Kim Klassen’s Light Paper on Soft Light

6.  Duplicated the background again, plopped it back on top at soft light

7.  Added Kim’s magic scratches on Screen blending mode

8.  Added Kim’s texture “Vintage” on Color Burn

9.  Duplicated the Vintage Layer, and changed the blending mode to Multiply

10.  Added a ttv frame on multiply

11.  Desaturated the image a bit

12.  Played with the levels to brighten it up.

 

Touch Up Tuesday's at the Paper Mama

 

Make sure you take a look at the other touchups!

{106/365} – Picture Fall – Time Out

Somedays, I think I’m perpetually on time out – a bit out of step with everyone else.  And, I guess that’s why self-portraiture is something that’s completely out of my comfort zone – because you have to be in sync on both sides of the camera.  I wasn’t, completely:

{106/365} 

My remote didn’t work, Lemon kept running in and out of the frame (not so good for the timer), and bouncing back into bed, grabbing my needles, and getting underway knitting in 10 seconds is also no easy feat.  But, it wasn’t as painful as I thought.

These girls took a lovely time-out (I think I took this last weekend, maybe) – and since I haven’t done a texture recipe in a while, I thought I’d take the rather dull originals and play with them:

Here’s the SOOC of the first one:

Girls in the Park Original 

And here’s after a bit of mad scientist messing:

Girls in the Park 

And, here’s the second one:

Girls in the Park 2 original 

Girls in the Park 2 

So, what did I do?  Maybe turned them into crap, I don’t know, but here it is:

girlsinparkworkspace

1.  Duplicated the background layer

2.  Added a brown color fill layer, I think on soft light

3.  Added a gradient map layer, from black to white, on soft light mode

4.  Duplicated the gradient map layer, changed the blending mode to normal, and then, instead of changing the opacity of the whole layer, I ended up brushing off about 50% with a brush (I originally was only going to the black and white of some of it, but then took it off all of it)

5.  Added Kim Klassen’s Light Paper on Soft Light

6.  Duplicated the background again, plopped it back on top at soft light

7.  Added Kim’s magic scratches on Screen blending mode

8.  Added Kim’s texture “Vintage” on Color Burn

9.  Duplicated the Vintage Layer, and changed the blending mode to Multiply

10.  Added a ttv frame on multiply

11.  Desaturated the image a bit

12.  Played with the levels to brighten it up.

 

Touch Up Tuesday's at the Paper Mama

 

Make sure you take a look at the other touchups!

Around the Net – A Quick Bit of Sharing

Yesterday, for the first time in a long time, I did a bit of internet surfing, and found these absolutely FREE gems of photography/photoshop wisdom – check them out!

  • Paint the Moon – I love my Paint the Moon actions, and I love them even more since I’ve watched Annie Manning show us how it’s done, Fly on the Wall style.  Right now, she has three or four videos posted of her own personal editing using her fabulous actions.  Even if you don’t have her actions, you probably have ones that are similar, and her step by step, working through a photo edit,  is amazing.

 

 

  • MCP Actions hosted a six part, guest blogger series on How to Use Your Flash.  As I think I’ve mentioned, I fear the flash (because I don’t own one), and I found these posts enlightening (tee hee, get it . . .) but also calming, encouraging, and reading it was time well spent.

 

  • And finally, for now, Darcy from My Three Boybarians is hosting a photography series, 31 Days to a Better Photo.  And if you follow the link to her photo series, you will also find links to 7 other blogs hosting various 31 Days to a Better Whatever series.

 

Good stuff all around!

{81/365} – Touch Up Texture Tuesday

 voitlander2 

{80/365}

 

Not only does Kim Klassen post textures on Friday, on Tuesday’s she does a 2fer offer – the 2 photos above were simple edits — first, I used Pioneer Woman’s Seventies Action, then I took Kim’s new texture Paper Script II and plopped it on top on Overlay.

Then, I continued to play.

And really, if you’re at all nervous about those texture thingies, it’s just play.

First, this one:

coffeeandvoitlander 

coffeescreenshot 

First, I used Paint the Moon’s Tack Sharp action, just to sharpen it up a bit.

Then I adjusted the levels, desaturated the image, and then added a gradient map layer, from black to white.  I didn’t turn it completely black and white, though, but lowered the opacity to about 70%.

Next came the textures – Paper Script II (overlay) then Paper Script I (soft light). 

And that’s it!

But, wait, one more!

coffeecupandvoigtlander 

For whatever reason I had in my head, I didn’t want the coffee cup to be blue – I wanted to grunge it up.  So most of my efforts were directed towards the cup.

coffeecupscreenshot

So with this one, I didn’t desaturate the whole image – just the blues and the cyans.

Then, layer 1 is again Paper Script II, on overlay.

The next layer is one of her offerings from a few weeks ago, Autumn, on soft light.

Then, back to the cup.  The cup was still too blue, so I added a texture from her Baker’s Dozen Collection, Grunged Good, on multiply, and then I brushed it off everything but the cup.

Done!

Touch Up Tuesday's at the Paper Mama

{60/365} – “Touch Up” Tuesday and In a Yellow House – Trees

originalstreetscene 

So here’s my rather boring, SOOC tree image.  Looking at it, I knew I wanted something vintage, something postcardy, and I wanted to try Kim Klassen’s new Scratched texture.  I fiddled, and played, and sighed, and fretted, and this is the final edit –

scratchedstreet 

And just how did this craziness happen?

First, I used Nelly Nero’s Rankin Bleacher action to desaturate the photo:

Nelly Nero's Rankin Bleacher

 

Then, I added a few Florabella textures, and a Skeletalmess Texture, and it looked like this (to do the next steps, I had to flatten the image, and I forgot to save an unflattened version – so, just guessing, I think I used Elysium cool from Florabella and some old paper texture from Skeletalmess/Shadowhouse Creations):

And then it was time to scratch it up with Kim’s new texture, Gratitude Scratched.  And, here’s how it went:

 

To get the scratches to show up on the photo, I applied the texture three times – 1st – at Screen, 100%, next at Multiply, 100%, and then screen again at 15%.  At this point, you could see the scratches, but you couldn’t see the street.  So, I duplicated the background layer three times, all applied at 100% soft light, and then I desaturated the whole thing a bit.  Voila!

And, here’s another tree image just for good measure:

My Tree 

This was processed using Nelly Nero’s new set, Time Capsule – Growing Old Gracefully B&W.

So, go check out the rest of the forest and the touch ups!